WVU Women Crew at Sunrise

Few, if any other, students get up as early as the Women’s Rowing Crew. During the Spring and Fall rowing seasons they will be up at the crack of dawn and on the water or the training room. Early in the Spring they will have rowed miles even before daylight. By the time most other students are heading to class, they will too because they are students after all. See what a practice is like Sunrise on the Water with the WVU Women’s Crew

2015-05-13 08-37-16 - D4F_2885

2015 National Learn To Row Day

MRA invites the Morgantown community to join us for the  annual Learn To Row day. Discover what rowing is all about, see our boats (shells) and try your hand at rowing. Find out if this is a sport for you with hands on.

When:  Saturday June 6 from 10am to 3pm

Where: Boathouse, 40 Donley Street, Morgantown

2012-08-18 16-50-23 - 0037

2010-08-07 12-19-14 - IMG_9087

Men World Rowing Best Times 2015 (Wikepedia/FISA)

Boat Time Crew Nation Date Meet Location Ref
M1x
Single sculls
6:33.35 Mahé Drysdale New Zealand New Zealand 2009 World Rowing Championship Poznań, Poland
M2-
Coxless pairs
6:08.50 Hamish Bond
Eric Murray
New Zealand New Zealand 2012 Summer Olympics Eton Dorney, England [2]
M2+
Coxed pairs
6:33.26 Hamish Bond
Eric Murray
Caleb Shepherd (coxswain)
New Zealand New Zealand 2014 World Rowing Championship Amsterdam, Netherlands
M2x
Double sculls
5:59.72 Martin Sinković
Valent Sinković
Croatia Croatia 2014 World Rowing Championship Amsterdam, Netherlands
M4-
Coxless four
5:37.86 Andrew Triggs-Hodge
Tom James
Pete Reed
Alex Gregory
United Kingdom Great Britain 2012 World Rowing Cup II Lucerne, Switzerland
M4+
Coxed four
5:58.96 Matthias Ungemach
Armin Eichholz
Armin Weyrauch
Bahne Rabe
Joerg Dederding (coxswain)
Germany Germany 1991 Vienna, Austria
M4x
Quad sculls
5:32.26 Artem Morozov
Olexandr Nadtoka
Dmytro Mikhay
Ivan Dovgodko
Ukraine Ukraine 2014 World Rowing Championship Amsterdam, Netherlands
M8+
Eight
5:19.35 Gabriel Bergen
Douglas Csima
Robert Gibson
Conlin McCabe
Malcolm Howard
Andrew Byrnes
Jeremiah Brown
Will Crothers
Brian Price (coxswain)
Canada Canada 2012 World Rowing Cup II Lucerne, Switzerland
LM1x
Lightweight single sculls
6:43.37 Miani Marcello Italy Italy 2014 World Rowing Championship Amsterdam, Netherlands
LM2-
Lightweight coxless pairs
6:22.91 Simon Niepmann
Lucas Tramer
Switzerland Switzerland 2014 World Rowing Championship Amsterdam, Netherlands
LM2x
Lightweight double sculls
6:05.36 John Smith
James Thompson
South Africa South Africa 2014 World Rowing Championship Amsterdam, Netherlands
LM4-
Lightweight coxless four
5:43.16 Kasper Winther Jørgensen
Jacob Larsen
Jacob Barsøe
Morten Jørgensen
Denmark Denmark 2014 World Rowing Championship Amsterdam, Netherlands
LM4x
Lightweight quad sculls
5:42.75 Georgios Konsolas
Spyridon Giannaros
Panagiotis Magdanis
Eleftherios Konsolas
Greece Greece 2014 World Rowing Championship Amsterdam, Netherlands
LM8+
Lightweight eight
5:30.24 Klaus Altena
Christian Dahlke
Thomas Melges
Bernhard Stomporowski
Michael Kobor
Uwe Maerz
Michael Buchheit
Kai von Warburg
Olaf Kaska (coxswain)
Germany Germany 1992 Montreal, Canada

Women World Rowing Best Times 2015 (FISA)

Boat Time Crew Nation Year Meet Location Ref
W1x
Single sculls
7:07.71 Rumyana Neykova Bulgaria Bulgaria 2002 Seville, Spain
W2-
Coxless pairs
6:50.61 Helen Glover
Heather Stanning
United Kingdom Great Britain 2014 World Rowing Championship Amsterdam, Netherlands
W2x
Double sculls
6:37.31 Olympia Aldersey
Sally Kehoe
Australia Australia 2014 World Rowing Championship Amsterdam, Netherlands
W4-
Coxless four
6:14.36 Kayla Pratt
Kelsey Bevan
Grace Prendergast
Kerri Gowler
New Zealand New Zealand 2014 World Rowing Championship Amsterdam, Netherlands
W4x
Quad sculls
6:06.84 Carina Baer
Julia Lier
Annekatrin Thiele
Lisa Schmidla
Germany Germany 2014 World Rowing Championship Amsterdam Netherlands
W8+
Eight
5:54.16 Amanda Polk
Kerry Simmonds
Emily Regan
Lauren Schmetterling
Grace Luczak
Caroline Lind
Victoria Opitz
Heidi Robbins
Katelin Snyder (coxswain)
United States United States 2013 Lucerne, Switzerland [3]
LW1x
Lightweight single sculls
7:28.15 Constanţa Burcică Romania Romania 1994 Paris, France
LW2-
Lightweight coxless pairs
7:18.32 Eliza Blair
Justine Joyce
Australia Australia 1997 Lac d’Aiguebelette, France
LW2x
Lightweight double sculls
6:48.56 Sophie Mackenzie
Julia Edward
New Zealand New Zealand 2014 World Rowing Championship Amsterdam, Netherlands
LW4x
Lightweight quadruple sculls
6:15.95 Mirte Kraaijkamp
Elisabeth Woerner
Maaike Head
Ilse Paulis
Netherlands Netherlands 2014 World Rowing Championship Amsterdam, Netherlands

Women World Rowing Best Times [2013,Wikepedia]

Boat Time Crew Nation Year Meet Location Ref
W1x Single sculls 7:07.71 Rumyana Neykova Bulgaria Bulgaria 2002 Seville, Spain
W2- Coxless pairs 6:53.80 Georgeta Andrunache Viorica Susanu Romania Romania 1999 Lucerne, Switzerland
W2x Double sculls 6:38.78 Georgina Evers-Swindell Caroline Evers-Swindell New Zealand New Zealand 2002 Seville, Spain
W4- Coxless four 6:25.35 Kate Hornsey Amber Bradley Jo Lutz Robyn Selby Smith Australia Australia 2006 Eton, England
W4x Quad sculls 6:09.38 Julia Richter Carina Baer Tina Manker Stephanie Schiller Germany Germany 2012 Lucerne, Switzerland
W8+ Eight 5:54.16 Amanda Polk Kerry Simmonds Emily Regan Lauren Schmetterling Grace Luczak Caroline Lind Victoria Opitz Heidi Robbins Katelin Snyder (coxswain) United States United States 2013 Lucerne, Switzerland [3]
LW1x Lightweight single sculls 7:28.15 Constanţa Burcică Romania Romania 1994 Paris, France
LW2- Lightweight coxless pairs 7:18.32 Eliza Blair Justine Joyce Australia Australia 1997 Lac d’Aiguebelette, France
LW2x Lightweight double sculls 6:49.43 Louise Ayling Julia Edward New Zealand New Zealand 2012 Lucerne, Switzerland
LW4x Lightweight quadruple sculls 6:23.96 Liu Jing Fan Xuefei Chen Haixia Yu Hua (rower) China China 2006 Eton, England

US Women’s 8+ Post New World Best Time: 5:54.16

It may be old news by now, but these things tend to stay put for a while:
5:54.16 is the world best time ever by a women’s 8+. That was the result achieved on July 14, 2013 at the 2013 Samsung World Rowing Cup held in Lucerne Switzerland.

The U.S. women’s eight set the stage in Saturday’s race for lanes, winning by 7.2 seconds over the field. Then in the final, coxswain Katelin Snyder (Detroit, Mich.), Heidi Robbins (Hanover, N.H.), Vicky Opitz (Middleton, Wis.), Caroline Lind (Greensboro, N.C.), Grace Luczak (Ann Arbor, Mich.), Lauren Schmetterling (Moorestown, N.J.), Emily Regan (Buffalo, N.Y.), Kerry Simmonds (San Diego, Calif.) and Amanda Polk (Pittsburgh, Pa.) took the lead off the start, and continued to take seats through the 500-mark before gaining open water on Canada and Romania at the halfway point.

“I knew that we were 2:55 or so at the thousand, and that was on pace, so we just tried to shift the focus internally and it worked,” said Snyder, who coxed the U.S. to a gold medal in 2009.

The United States had a clear lead coming into the finish area, and won the race by 6.2 seconds, beating the previous world best time of 5:54.17, set by the U.S. in Lucerne last year, by one-hundredth of a second. Romania took silver in 6:00.42, with Canada bronze in 6:01.61.

“This feels absolutely incredible,” said Robbins, stroke seat and 2013 Princeton University graduate. “It’s so neat to be racing here in Switzerland; it’s a dream come true. To do this is just phenomenal.

“It was very much internal from the beginning. I didn’t even see the crews next to me. Then Katelin made a call at the thousand with our time, and I just thought ‘it’s go time, just do it and see what you can do.’”

Lind is the only rower to return from the London crew that won gold at the 2012 Olympic Games. The rest of the lineup includes a mix of under 23 champions and recent training center athletes.

“For two girls, it’s their first international experience and there is just a lot of really positive energy,” said Snyder. “It’s fun to practice, and it’s even more fun to race. The dynamic on the team is really great, and I’m just excited to be part of it again.” [Source:US Rowing]

HOTO 2013, Saturday, October 5th

For many years various members of MRA and the WVU Women’s and Men’s crew have participated in HOTO. HOTO stands for “Head of the Ohio” and it will mark its 27th anniversary this year. HOTO is a race that takes place in Pittsburgh along the Allegheny River. For many years the race started up river and finished at the point where the Allegheny and the Monongahela rivers meet and the Ohio river starts. Hence the name Head of the Ohio. In the last couple years, due to increasing build up near the stadiums, the race has reversed its course and now starts where it used to end and finishes up stream at the Washington Landing.

The course is 2.6 miles long and attracts people from all over the country. The variety of racing classes is one of the attractions of this event. There are Collegiate Athletic crews, College Clubs, High School competitions, Open Club classes, Mixed Gender crews, and Adaptive classes (handicapped individuals); people of all ages participate. Current MRA President David Rosen, has participated for the past several years and is looking towards competing once again. The WVU Women’s Crew and Men’s Crew will certainly be at the event and MRA keeps alive the dream of fielding an MRA Youth Crew. No matter what the event is one not to be lost.

John M. Duarte, 2013

Rowing Best Times

I have yet to find a conclusive response to the question often asked as to: ”what is the top speed of a rowing shell?”

A few years ago I saw a video post of an 8 men crew pulling up a water skier for some distance.

The average speed of current world best Rowing Times recognized by FISA is 22.5 Km/Hour or about 14 MPH for the Men’s 8+; 5:19:35 over the 2000m course.

There were supposedly burst of over 24KM/Hour on that race. The men’s 8+ is the overall fastest Rowing craft.

Because environmental conditions affect the rowing speed, FISA Rowing governing body recognizes Best Times and not world records.

Below are the current recognized best Rowing Times as posted in Wikipedia.

Men

Boat Time Crew Nation Date Meet Location Ref
M1x
Single sculls
6:33.35 Mahé Drysdale New Zealand 2009 Poznań, Poland
M2-
Coxless pairs
6:08.50 Hamish Bond
Eric Murray
New Zealand 2012 Summer Olympics Eton Dorney, England [2]
M2+
Coxed pairs
6:42.16 Igor Boraska
Tihomir Franković
Milan Razov (coxswain)
Croatia 1994 Indianapolis, United States
M2x
Double sculls
6:03.25 Adrien Hardy
Jean-Baptiste Macquet
France 2006 Poznań, Poland
M4-
Coxless four
5:37.86 Andrew Triggs-Hodge
Tom James
Pete Reed
Alex Gregory
Great Britain 2012 Lucerne, Switzerland
M4+
Coxed four
5:58.96 Matthias Ungemach
Armin Eichholz
Armin Weyrauch
Bahne Rabe
Joerg Dederding (coxswain)
Germany 1991 Vienna, Austria
M4x
Quad sculls
5:33.15 Vladislav Ryabcev
Alexey Svirin
Nikita Morgachev
Sergei Fedorovtsev
Russia 2012 Lucerne,Switzerland
M8+
Eight
5:19.35 Gabriel Bergen
Douglas Csima
Robert Gibson
Conlin McCabe
Malcolm Howard
Andrew Byrnes
Jeremiah Brown
Will Crothers
Brian Price (coxswain)
Canada 2012 Lucerne, Switzerland
LM1x
Lightweight single sculls
6:46.93 Jeremie Azou France 2011 Amsterdam, Netherlands
LM2-
Lightweight coxless pairs
6:26.21 Tony O’Connor
Neville Maxwell
Ireland 1994 Paris, France
LM2x
Lightweight double sculls
6:10.02 Mads Rasmussen
Rasmus Quist
Denmark 2007 Amsterdam, Netherlands
LM4-
Lightweight coxless four
5:45.60 Thomas Poulsen
Thomas Ebert
Eskild Ebbesen
Victor Feddersen
Denmark 1999 Lucerne, Switzerland
LM4x
Lightweight quad sculls
5:45.18 Francesco Esposito
Massimo Lana
Michelangelo Crispi
Massimo Guglielmi
Italy 1992 Montreal, Canada
LM8+
Lightweight eight
5:30.24 Klaus Altena
Christian Dahlke
Thomas Melges
Bernhard Stomporowski
Michael Kobor
Uwe Maerz
Michael Buchheit
Kai von Warburg
Olaf Kaska (coxswain)
Germany 1992 Montreal, Canada

Indoor Records

Category Time Split Nation Year Name
Open Men 5:36.6 1:24.1 New Zealand 2008 Rob Waddell
Lightweight Men 5:56.7 1:29.175 Denmark 2013 Henrik Stephansen
Open Women 6:28.4 1:37.1 France 2005 Sophie Balmary
Lightweight Women 6:54.7 1:43.7 United States 2010 Ursula Grobler
  • Lwt Men: 75 kg (170 lb) maximum weight
  • Lwt Women: 61.5 kg (136 lb) maximum weight [3]

John M. Duarte

How I came to participate in HOTO 2009 by Jim Fishback – reprint

[Published Fall-winter 2009]

I moved to Morgantown in July 2008 and spent a lot of time on my road bike through the end of the fall. On one of my trips up the bike path, heading to the Decker’s Creek trail, I noticed a flyer for Mon Rowing but made no effort to contact the club until early this year. I had rowed for TC Williams High School in Alexandria, VA my junior year, one summer with the Occoquan Boat Club while I was in college and two summers with Boulder Community Rowing about 5 years ago. I was really excited about the prospect of rowing again.

Following an email to info@monrowing.org, I was contacted by John Duarte who informed me there would be a membership meeting in early March. I attended the meeting, met some of the members, and began rowing the Alden Horizon within the next few days with the help of Eric Hopkins. After a few trips out in the Alden I managed to sprain a leg trying to gorilla that big plastic boat around. Three weeks later I was back at it, rowing the double “SeaShell” and then the new Edon with its pontoons installed. In early June I scheduled a lesson with Meg Ayers (volunteer coach for WVU Women’s Crew) who suggested I take the Peinert out; I was reluctant because I had never rowed a scull prior to the Alden and Edon, but agreed to give it a try.

I never went back to the beginner boats and began to accumulate much water time in the Peinert #23. In fact, I have logged more miles on the river this summer than I have on the bike this year. As I write this I have been out for about 100 sessions. Most of these trips have been solo, however Andrew White has accompanied me on a handful of runs and more recently Jenna LaPointe (WVU Men’s club coach) has joined me in the old Vespoli.

But I digress; this article is supposed to be about the 2009 Head of the Ohio. In preparation for the race, Dr. David Rosen offered to let me try out his ECHO Ace on CheatLake. In the event that I couldn’t find insurance for one of the club boats I wanted a backup plan. As the Ace is a modern high tech design it definitely rowed faster than the Peinert but I didn’t quite attain proficiency keeping it on keel in the few trials I made. Right around this time, just for laughs, I “built a boat” on the Vespoli website. The next day I received a call from John Sekulich (“JP”) from Vespoli. We talked for a while before he asked me if I would be going to HOTO. He said he would be there with boats to look at; I asked if it was possible for me to race one. That possibility turned to reality.

I made the run up to Pittsburgh on Friday afternoon with hopes of getting a chance to try the Matrix 27 before race day. My timing was off; JP had left the Three Rivers Rowing Association facility for the parking lot between PNC and Heinz field where all the boat trailers would assemble in the following hours. After taking a look around the TRRA boathouse I made my way down to the finish line and parking lot. I had already made arrangements to meet JP in the morning so I grabbed a bite to eat, my registration packet and wandered around the waterfront. While eating I met some folks from TRRA and told them about my hopes of rowing that evening. Fortunately they had boats that needed to be rowed down to the start line; the rules of the race dictated that all boats must originate from the finish line docking area the following morning. So I took a launch ride up to the TRAA boathouse and helped row an 8 down to the start.

I was up by 5 am the following morning, out of the hotel and on the road by 5:30. I arrived early enough to park right next to Heinz, within 100 feet of the Vespoli trailer. I met up with JP and watched him set up the Matrix before I went down to watch the WVU women come down the course, for 3rd and 6th places in the 14 boat women’s open 8+ race. Shortly after, I hustled to get my clothes on and get the boat down to the water.

My first few strokes were nothing short of embarrassing but I was quickly across the river and out of site of immediate scrutiny. Moments later I heard a very tiny voice say “I think you should weigh enough”; a high school 4+ was right off my bow! I dug the blades in for a sketchy stop and an almost swim. After recovering physically and emotionally I made my way up to the start area for a longish wait for the singles races to begin.

Less than a couple minutes before the men’s singles were called to the starting area I noticed the brace and oarlock hardware for the starboard rigger were levitating. I was bummed! The nut that secures everything was still there but a few washers had gone missing. I hand-tightened all and asked a couple boats near me if any had tools. No-one had tools but moments after raising my hand a launch was by my side handing me a wrench. I got all tight and made my way just in time to start in order. Another minute and I would have had to start at the end of all the singles and out of my age-class. Not how I wanted to do my first race in over 28 years.

The start worked out, I had two boats pass, but then I went off course. I thought missing a buoy was a 30 second penalty, so I spent at least that long pivoting the boat back inside the buoy with only a few hundred meters left to race. At the finish I heard cheers for “Fishback!” I recognized Meg’s voice joined by many others, who I assume were WVU women, though I guess it could have been other well meaning spectators too.

After docking, getting the boat back up to the trailer, and thanking JP profusely, I went back down to the water to watch some more races. Eric had called while I was on the water and we met up a few minutes later. After running into David Rosen and his daughter and chatting (and admiring David’s gold medal) Eric and I walked up the racecourse to watch the boats come down from additional vantage points.

The weather and water were a little ugly that day and got worse as the afternoon wore on. We ended up on a lookout area near the start when the last race went down the course. It was the last race of the day because of the misfortune we were about to witness. First, one men’s 8+ came down looking like it was just being rowed poorly and then we noticed it was taking on water in the bow, and moments later it was fully submerged. While launches arrived to pluck the passengers from the swamped boat another 8+ came down the course. A coach from this boat was also on the lookout and was dismayed to see the Bowman had lost his seat and couldn’t manage to get it back. Soon this boat was completely swamped too. In total three boats went down before the rest of the events were cancelled; all were contesting the same race.

I had a fantastic time at the HOTO and can’t wait to get out there and race again. It’s been great to get back on the water and like living alone for the first time I am really enjoying the freedom of sculling. If our club can muster enough folks for a crew I would like to re-experience that too. I am so grateful that MRA is here in Morgantown and that I was able to connect with them. I would like to acknowledge Meg Ayers for the lessons she gave me and WVU women’s crew for sharing their boathouse with us. Also, thanks to Jimmy King for taking the Peinert up to HOTO for me, in the event I couldn’t row the Matrix I wanted a backup. This weekend I am driving 500 miles to Dexter, NY to look at a “previously owned” Vespoli Matrix 27 – I am that into this sport. Anybody interested in a nice road bike??

[This article was initially published during the winter 2009-2010]